DSOY 2017

01/28/2018   
 

FORT LEONARD WOOD Mo. — After a week of intense competition, the 2017 TRADOC Drill Sergeant and AIT Platoon Sergeant of the Year has come to an end.

As one the Army’s most physical and mentally demanding competitions, the five day event gives opportunity to some of the Army’s leading non-commissioned officers (NCO) to compete for the titles of Drill Sergeant and AIT Platoon Sergeant of the Year at Fort Leonard Wood Missouri, Sept. 12-15 2017. 

“It’s a chance for the Army’s best trainers to showcase what they know , but what really makes it important is the comradery that this builds, the teamwork,” said Sgt 1st Class Brandon Laspe, the Non-Commissioned Officer in Charge and 2016 AIT Platoon Sergeant of the Year.

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The 2017 TRADOC Drill Sergeant and AIT Platoon Sergeant of the Year competition concluded Sept 15 at Gammon Field, Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. Competitors were graded on multiple warrior tasks and drills and the winners were announced during a closing ceremony. U.S. Army photo by Spc. Tynisha Daniel/ released

This years competition hosted 16 competitors marking it as the first year that one Drill and AIT Sergeant of the Year be selected from the active and reserve components combined.

“I think having one winner is the right thing to do, we’re all one Army,” said Staff Sgt. Justine Bottorff, a competitor and drill sergeant assigned to the 98th Training Division from Buffalo N.Y.

Drill Sergeant, Staff Sgt. Justine Bottorff completes evaluate a casualty (Tactical Combat Casualty Care) lane at the 2017 TRADOC Drill Sergeant and AIT Platoon Sergeant of the Year competition. Competitors are graded on numerous warrior tasks at Fort Leonard Wood, Mo. The competition runs Sept 11-15.

U.S. Army photo by Spc. Tynisha Daniel/ released

Although the competitions would only have one winner  Army wide, the competitors did not let it affect their motivation in competing, seeing themselves as teammates above all else.

Allowing some of the Army’s most promising NCOs the opportunity to volunteer and showcase their talents and professionalism at the DSOY and PSOY offers great opportunities for their future.

“Every time I’ve competed in any military competition I’ve come away better and stronger in knowing more than I did before,” said Laspe. 

Competing for the 2017 title confirms NCOs’ abilities and expertise as instructors, and builds morale and comradity between the competitors.

Drill Sergeant, Sgt. Christopher Moses assigned to the 95th training division performs dead lift on day 3 of the 2017 TRADOC Drill Sergeant and AIT Platoon Sergeant of the Year competition. Competitors are graded on numerous warrior tasks. The competition runs Sept 11-15.

U.S. Army photo by Spc. Tynisha Daniel/ released

Similar to other Army competitions the DSOY focuses on each competitor’s ability to teach, as their day-to-day duties require them to teach the initial entry Soldier. Competitors are also on graded on their physical capabilities.

“I arrived here (Fort Leonard Wood) a month ago, I was able to train here and back home to prepare for the events, “said Sgt. Christopher Moses, a drill sergeant assigned to the 95th training division from Lawton, Okla.

With events such as day/night land navigation, multiple obstacle courses, a 12-mile ruck march and combatives, etc. the competitors’ days began before dawn and concluded late into the night.

“I came in expecting long days, we had to hit the ground running,” said Moses.

This year’s competition was like no other, the extended days weren’t  “just another” duty day.

“Picture the army in your mind, that’s pretty much what they’re being tested on, its such a large variety of tasks, it really highlights the total Soldier,” said Laspe.

The 2017 Drill Sergeant and Platoon Sergeant of the Year are Drill Sergeant (Staff Sgt.) Chad Hickey, representing Fort Leonard Wood, Mo., and AIT Platoon Sergeant Staff Sgt. Brian Ivery representing Presidio of Monterey, Calif.

Although winners of the competition did not include an Army Reserve Soldier, those competitors do not take it as a loss but as an opportunity to prepare and perform at next year’s competition.

“Anything worth having anything challenging is definitely well worth it in the end,” said Staff Sgt, Ivery.

“The thing that I really want them (competitors) to take away is that sense of pride and accomplishment in knowing that they made it to this level and successfully completed this competition, even just finishing is something that most people simply couldn’t do,” concluded Laspe.

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The Griffon Spring 2018

Vol. 41.4 | Winter 2018

The Griffon
The Griffon is written and published quarterly in the interest of the 108th National Training Command.

 






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