Family Care Plan update (AR 600-20)

From the Office of the Staff Judge Advocate...

02/19/2010   
 

AR 600-20 (Army Command Policy) has recently been revised with important changes involving Family Care Plans. A Family Care Plan should assist Soldiers in providing for the care of their family members while the Soldier is away from home due to military requirements including during annual training, regularly scheduled battle assemblies or deployment. Soldiers must arrange for the care of their family members in order to be available and able to perform duty at all times without interference of family responsibilities. Soldiers will be counseled on voluntary and involuntary separation whenever parenthood interferes with military responsibilities.

Although a DA Form 5305 (Family Care Plan) is not a legal document and it cannot change a court-mandated custodial arrangement or interfere with a natural parent’s right to custody of their child, it is vital plan which details the care of a Soldier’s family members when military duties prevent the Soldier from doing so. It will include proof that guardians and escorts have been thoroughly briefed on the responsibilities they will assume for the sponsor/Soldier and the procedures for accessing military and civilian facilities and services on behalf of the family members. It will attest that the guardian and escort agreed to provide care and have been provided all necessary legal authority and means to do so. It will include proof that the Soldier has obtained consent to the planned designation of guardianship from all parties with a legal interest in the custody and care of minor children. 

Soldiers are ultimately responsible for implementing the Family Care Plan and ensuring the care of their family members. DA Form 5305 may be executed at any time when conditions warrant and family care is necessary due to the required military absence of the Soldier.  Commanders will conduct or arrange for Family Care Plan counseling and require a Family Care Plan be completed under a variety of conditions such as when (1) a pregnant Soldier has no spouse or is divorced, widowed or separated or is residing without her spouse or is married to another service member; (2) a Soldier, who has no spouse or is residing apart from the spouse or is half of a “dual-military” couple, has joint or full legal and physical custody of one or more family members under the age of 19 or who has adult family members incapable of self-care regardless of age; (3) a Soldier, who is divorced and not remarried, has liberal or extended visitation rights by court decree that allows family members to be solely in the Soldier’s care in excess of 30 consecutive days; or (4) a Soldier has a spouse who is incapable of self-care or is otherwise physically, mentally or emotionally disabled so as to require special care or assistance.

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nanny
Created by Anonymous in 12/16/2013 1:13:18 PMYou can get a nanny to come in to help out around the house during the day. I hired one before.
Appointments
Created by Anonymous in 3/4/2013 5:11:36 PMIf your child has to go to a doctors appiontment does it state anywhere that you have to call up your short term family care plan person so they can take them. Thats not counting field problems or anything, just a regular work day with no type of training or anything?
New Comment
Created by Anonymous in 2/28/2012 8:48:18 AMCheck to see if there is some kind of home care service, like they do for the elderly that can come into you home during the day to help care for your family. I don't know what your rank is but there may be some assistance available financially. Check with you Chaplain and your Family Support Group.
While deployed
Created by Anonymous in 1/29/2012 11:11:10 AMSo i've been deployed for about 7 months now, and my wife just found out that she need to have surgery, this surgery is not an option and must be done within the next couple of weeks, her down time will be from 6-8 weeks, we have 4 children, oldes 11 and youngest 1, during this time she is unable to take care of them, i've talked to my chain of Command about this, and they have also received a Red Cross messege, now my chain of command told tme that the most i could get was 4 days, then they said 2 weeks, well even at 2 week thats not enought time for her to get back on her feet to take care of the kids...Now i dont know what to do, i've been reading AR 600-20, and says that i did not need a family care plan since my wife is a civ, and we arent both military. But i do need to be home to help her out. Can anyone give me any advice pls.

   

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